Our Projects

COVID Chronicles Delaware

 

COVID Chronicles Delaware is an initiative of the Delaware History Society, asking Delawareans to reflect on their experiences living through the COVID-19 pandemic and capture them through writing, art, image, or song. Submissions will become part of the permanent Delaware Historical Society digital collection to serve individually and collectively as primary sources for future generations.

Whether you are on the front lines of the pandemic, doing your part to practice social distancing, or getting creative while sheltering in place, the Delaware Historical Society wants to know your story!

The Journey to Freedom Blog

 

The Journey to Freedom Blog aims to provide engaging content about Delaware’s Black history that will nurture an environment of continual learning. A blog provides the Mitchell Center with a fast, easy, and flexible way to provide new content to our community. You can expect the blog to provide content such as interviews, highlights on objects in our collections, written pieces from guest authors, interesting stories about Delaware’s Black history, and general Mitchell Center updates. The Journey to Freedom Blog will also be the home to the Unequal Justice in Delaware project.

Collaborative Projects

History Matters

 

The Delaware Historical Society, together with Delaware Public Media, is proud to present History MattersHistory Matters digs into the Delaware Historical Society’s archives and collections to highlight people, places, and events of historical significance to Delaware and explore their connections to present-day news. Special thanks to Delaware Public Media for its continued partnership in the production of these features and to the Delaware Public Archives, Hagley Museum and Library and the Lewes Historical Society for their participation and assistance.

Voices of the Elders

 

The Mitchell Center for African American Heritage’s Voices of the Elders oral history series highlights six prominent African American community leaders in Delaware. The series features interviews with Dr. Joseph E. Johnson, Esthelda Parker-Selby, The Reverend Canon Lloyd S. Casson, James H. Gilliam, Sr., Mayor George Wright, Jr. and Dr. Lozelle DeLuz.
 

Note: By following the above button, you will be exiting dehistory.org and an external website will open in a new tab.

Wilmington 1968

 

2018 marked the 50th anniversary of the civil disturbances that followed the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. While demonstrations occurred in major cities across the country, Wilmington suffered through the longest occupation by the National Guard. Wilmington’s West Central City and Eastside neighborhoods were patrolled for nine months, from April to December. The military occupation exacerbated existing divisions of race and class, and the tensions of that time reverberate down to the present day.

The Delaware Historical Society and Mitchell Center for African American Heritage is proudly a part of the community-wide reflection, Wilmington 1968. This local series includes projects, exhibitions, and programs that remember the occupation and uprising in Wilmington and respond to critical issues facing the community today.